Women in Engineering

Rutgers University Women in Engineering Initiative (RU WEI) was established to provide support for current and future female engineers and to engage alumni, industry, and other partners in Rutgers engineering programs. While the field of engineering might once have been dominated nearly exclusively by men, more and more women are not only studying engineering, but finding professional success and attaining leadership roles in dynamic industries. 

Rutgers continues to recruit and retain an ever increasing number of women to its engineering program. It is a national leader in awarding doctoral degrees to women, and includes many women among its faculty.  The School of Engineering also includes a student chapter of the Society of Women Engineers and invites alumnae to return to campus for mentoring and leadership advisory boards.

WIE FAST FACTS

  • Retention rate of WIE: 94% WIE vs. 92% overall SoE

  • Career placement rates (industry and post-grad studies) compared to whole school : 88% WIE vs. 87% overall SoE

  • Mean Starting salary: $65,648

  • Class of 2021: 29% (national average: 22%)

  • Female faculty: more than 20% (national average: 16%)

  • 1 out of 3 women receive scholarships

  • More than 50% WIE leading 40 active engineering student organizations 

Strong Communities

Society of Women Engineers

The award-winning SWE-Rutgers Section was chartered in 1975. Its members include both female and male engineering students whose cause is to promote women in engineering. The Society provides a platform for women to achieve full potential in careers as engineers and leaders, expands the image of the engineering profession as a positive force in the quality of life, and demonstrates the value of diversity.  With 250+ active participants, SWE-Rutgers offers scholarship opportunities, SWE Leader Learner Program (SWELL) and Industry Mentorship Program (IMP) among many other programs and networking events.

Reilly DELLC

The Reilly Douglass Engineering Living-Learning Community (Reilly DELLC) is a partnership between the School of Engineering and Douglass Residential College for women at Rutgers University. The community’s two central goals are to recruit and retain more women in engineering, and to prepare those women for successful engineering careers. Reilly DELLC opened in 2012 with 20 students in its inaugural class. Now in its fifth year, 140 women are part of the community. The retention rate for these students is 95 percent.

Phi Sigma Rho

Phi Sigma Rho is the national social sorority for women majoring in engineering and engineering technology. It combines Greek life and scholarship to promote: High standards of personal integrity, respect, and character; Lifelong bonds of sisterhood; Academic and professional excellence with a social balance; Through shared experiences, common bonds, and recognition of service and achievement.  Phi Sigma Rho Rutgers Chapter was established in 2003.  It has a strong Rutgers Alumnae network consisting of over 100 women and a National Alumnae Network of over 2,000 women.