News

April 2018

April 19, 2018
Parishad Karimi captured first place in the graduate category of ACM’s Student Research Competition at the Grace Hopper Celebration held October 2017 in Orlando. Her research was sparked by the exponential growth of wireless networks and the incompatibility of different access technologies within the same frequency band. To solve this problem, she proposed SMART, a distributed resource management architecture that enables coordinated resource usage.
April 18, 2018
During visit, Congressman Frank Pallone Jr. announces legislation to expand innovative research partnerships between FDA and universities Food and Drug Administration commissioner Scott Gottlieb grew up in East Brunswick and spent many weekend days at Rutgers, attending football games and other events.  On Monday, he returned to tour the Center for Structured Organic Particulate Systems (C-SOPS) at Rutgers-New Brunswick to discuss its leading role in the advancement of innovative technology in pharmaceutical production.
April 17, 2018
School of Engineering to use the same technology in its classrooms that companies worldwide depend on to design some of today’s most sophisticated products Rutgers University-New Brunswick’s School of Engineering has received an in-kind software grant from Siemens PLM Software.
April 16, 2018
School of Engineering Associate Dean Ilene Rosen and civil and environmental engineering senior Shrey Ghate received My Mark awards at the 2018 Mark Leadership Conference. The awards recognize the “mark” that exceptional students and faculty members have left on the Rutgers community.
April 12, 2018
Rutgers, Columbia and NYU to Lead Research Aimed at Pushing Limits of Wireless-Networking NEW YORK, Monday, April 9, 2018 – Fourth generation wireless, better known as 4G, turned mobile phones into movie-streaming platforms, but the next wireless revolution promises more than speedy downloads. It could pave the way for surgeons operating remotely on patients, cars that rarely crash, and events that can be vividly experienced from thousands of miles away.
April 3, 2018
Rutgers scholar is a pioneer in acoustic cloaking research

March 2018

March 26, 2018
Two teams made Rutgers history by winning the Hult Prize Regionals Competition for their groundbreaking energy innovations. Known as the Nobel Prize for students, the Hult Prize is the world’s largest engine for innovative startups emerging from college campuses. This year’s challenge was to build a scalable, sustainable social enterprise that harnesses the power of energy to transform the lives of 10 million people by 2025, according to the Hult Prize challenge document.
March 19, 2018
March 19, 2018 Professor seeks “helluva (better) way to run a railroad” Millions of commuters and goods worth billions of dollars rely on the safety and efficiency of railway systems in the region, including NJ Transit, Amtrak, PATH, New York City subways, CSX Corp., Norfolk Southern Corp. and many shortline freight railroads. And in an era of high-profile railroad accidents and rising rail traffic, many of these systems face challenges ranging from infrastructure integrity to operational safety to uncertainty regarding future funding.
March 15, 2018
Electrical and computer engineering sophomore Ernest Chiu ranked No. 28 out of the 4,638 participants in the prestigious Mathematical Association of America’s William Lowell Putnam Competition. His outstanding performance placed him in the 99.4 percentile of all undergraduate students who participated in the December 2017 competition. “The Putnam Competition is THE undergrad math competition in the United States and Canada, dating back to 1938,” Distinguished Professor of Mathematics Michael Beals says.
March 1, 2018
The remote Arctic region remains largely a mystery to scientists due to its sheer magnitude. The three-year collaborative project ICEBERG is determined to change that. Funded by a $1.85 million National Science Foundation grant, the ICEBERG research team will employ supercomputers to analyze high resolution images of the Arctic taken via satellite. The ultimate goal is to provide scientists with a new imagery-computing superhighway that will allow them to study processes at much larger spatial scales than has been previously possible.

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